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The Truth About Death Row Inmates

The Truth About Death Row Inmates

Death row inmates are individuals who have been convicted of committing capital crimes and have been sentenced to the death penalty as punishment. In many instances, there are separate facilities to house death row inmates, however, this is not always the case. A death row inmate will remain “on death row” until the appeals process has been complete. 
Subsequently, if his/her sentence is not overturned, his/her execution will be scheduled. While awaiting his/her execution, a death row inmate will remain in a maximum security prison. In many instances, an individual will be required to remain incarcerated for many years before his/her fate is decided and his/her execution is carried out. For example, it is possible for an inmate to remain on death row for over ten years, with the longest recorded stay being thirty five years.
Unless their sentences are overturned, death row inmates will eventually be executed by lethal gas, lethal injection, firing squad, hanging, or electrocution. Currently, the majority of Texas death row inmates, and death row inmates throughout the country, are executed by lethal injection. 
Texas has one of the largest populations of death row inmates in the country, along with Florida and California. As of 2008, there were of 3,500 people on death row. Only 61 of these inmates were women. Death row inmates have been convicted of murder, though the specific aspects of each case vary greatly. For example, an individual who shot another person, whether purposely or accidentally, during a robbery, can be on death row with a serial murderer. 

Federal Prisons for Federal Inmates

Federal Prisons for Federal Inmates

A federal inmate is an individual who is sentenced to spend time in a federal prison. In order for an individual to become a federal inmate, he/she must commit a federal crime, and subsequently be tried and convicted by a federal court. If he/she is tried by a state court, he/she will be required to carry out his/her sentence in a state prison, thereby making him/her a state prison inmate.
The severity of the crime that an individual commits does not determine whether he/she will serve his/her sentence in a state prison or a federal prison. There are many different types of crimes that may be tried in a federal court. For example, fraud, forgery, embezzlement, counterfeiting, extortion, cyber crimes, and insider trading are all considered to be federal crimes. Violent crimes, including murder and arson can be tried by a federal court, though they are usually addressed by state courts. 
As a result of the variety of crimes that can be tried by federal courts, federal prison inmates may range a great deal in demeanor and personality. The federal prison system maintains numerous prisons, all of which are considered to have different levels of security. 
The most dangerous federal prison inmates are generally contained within maximum security federal prisons. For example, individuals convicted of serial murder or crimes against children may be kept in a maximum security federal facility. Convicts who have not committed violent crimes may remain in minimum security federal prisons.