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Prison Cell

Prison Bars

Prison Bars

Arguably the most recognizable or synonymous term associated with a prison is the image of solid steel bars. Prison bars are used to confine individuals convicted of a serious offense or felony such as murder, assault, armed burglary, rape etc.
Jail cells are small 6 by 8 foot rooms used to confine individuals convicted of a wrong doing. Jail cells are a fundamental application to enforce the United States’ legal system; without the cells prisoners would roam free or be grouped without surveillance or proper organization. Jail cells are constructed to house as many wrongdoers within a facility as possible; they are stacked on top of each other, and assorted in rows to organize a prison and house as many convicts as possible. As prisons become overcrowded the need for more organized and tighter confinements become a necessity.
Jail cells are comprised of steel and brick; these sturdy materials eliminate the chances of vandalism or escape. The typical jail cell unit has 3 walls and a strong steel door that locks from the outside. The door in some cases is solid, with a small window to observe the inmates. In most instances however, jail cells contain a steel door that is comprised of elongated stainless steel bars. 
These prison bars allow correctional officers to freely observe the inmates room as well as his actions. Furthermore, the prison bars also offer an inmate the chance to peer outside of his cell, and even interact with his neighboring cell mates. The openness that prison bars offer can also lead to problems however, as interactions between inmates can spark controversy and problems that extend beyond their confinement. The prison bars are extremely sturdy; they are impossible to bend or snap, diminishing any chance of escape or vandalism.

County Jail Inmates

County Jail Inmates

Many counties in states throughout the country maintain their own jails. A county jail is operated by the sheriff’s department within that county. In addition to county jails, states will maintain a state prison. State prisons are generally larger and more extensive than county jails. 
In most instances, state prisons are reserved for convicts who are sentenced to spend many years in prison. On the other hand, county jails are reserved for individuals who have been given a short sentence, or who have not yet undergone their trial. County jails inmates have been accused of committing crimes, however, they have not necessarily been convicted of those crimes. 
If an individual has been accused of committing an offense, he/she may become a county jail inmate, and remain contained within the county jail until he/she is convicted of a crime, or pardoned. In the event that he/she is convicted and sentenced, he/she may be transported to a state or federal prison, depending upon the sentence he/she received.
In addition to people awaiting trial, county jail inmates may also be convicts who committed relatively minor offenses, and thereby received a short prison sentence. In most instances, inmates contained within a county jail have acquired a prison sentence of one year, or less. 
Due to the existence of judicial discretion, the crimes that were committed to land convicts in county jails may very substantially. While one inmate may have been convicted of carrying a concealed weapon, another may have been charged with a drug offense. Nevertheless, county jail inmates are usually not considered to be dangerous, high risk prisoners. 

Can Cell Blocks Keep Prisoners In?

Can Cell Blocks Keep Prisoners In?

A cell block is a unit within a prison or correctional facility that is comprised of multiple jail cells. Cell blocks enable correctional facilities to house a large number of convicts or those convicted of illegal acts in a highly organized and efficient manner. 
The amount of units or jail cells within a cell block will vary based on the correctional facility and the respective security level attached to it. In most cases, cell blocks are comprised of dozens of jail cells and are organized based on name, date of violation, or the severity of the crime in question. Cell blocks are organized through lettering or numbers; for instance, a correctional facility can contain 6 cell blocks, with the first cell block appropriately labeled ‘cell block A’ and the last cell block labeled ‘cell block E.’
The cell block structure was designed to organize and keep correctional facilities running efficiently. The most common problem associated with an American correctional facility revolves around overcrowding. The cell block was created to mitigate population problems; by grouping inmates and their cells within a compact unit, the correctional facility is optimally using the limited space. 
Typically, each cell block is patrolled or supervised by a team of prison guards or correctional officers. To properly execute their jobs, these guards simply can walk up and down the row of cells, while peering inside the cells to observe the inmates and their activity.