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All You Need To Know About Jail

All You Need To Know About Jail

What is a Correctional Facility?
The institution colloquially regarded as Jail is included within the classification of a penal system existing within a country or nation. The Department of Corrections within the United States is a governmental branchresponsible for the regulation and oversight of Federal correctional institutions and prison facilities.
Although jails and prisons are both classified as correctional facilities that provide the means of incarceration, a contrast between both jail and prison exists within a variety of factors – this contrast is typically found upon the examination of not only the administration structure belonging to the prison or jail in question, but also to the respective size of the institution, the population of inmates, the duration of incarceration within the facility, the capacity of the facility, and the nature of the resources available with regard to the facilities in question:

What is a Jail?

A Jailis acorrectional institutionthat exists outside of the jurisdiction belonging toa specific Department of Corrections, as well as the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Jails are typically utilized to incarcerate inmates on a more localized level; as a result, these types of facilities commonly exist withinthe jurisdiction of towns, cities, or counties. The following classification and detailing is common with regard to the classification of a jail in contrast to the classification of a prison:
A Jail is considered to house criminals for periods of incarceration that are far more brief than those taking place within the level of prisons
A jail typically houses individuals apprehended in the presumed involvement of crimes and criminal activities considered to be less severe than those incarcerated within a prison system
A Jails is typically regulated and overseen by the appropriate branch of local government in lieu of the overarching state government branch belonging to the state in which the jail resides
A Jail will typically house inmates for a period not exceeding a year’s time
Prisons are institutions that may exist within an individual states’ Department of Corrections; prisons may also be operated and regulated on a Federal level, which is typically under the jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP)
A Prison – in contrast to a jail – may range from security level to the level of inmate population; prisons can house inmates who have been convicted for the most severe crime
Inmates incarcerated in a prison facility may be sentenced to periods of incarceration ranging from 1 year to life imprisonment – in the event that capital punishment is facilitated in a specific state, a prison can administer that process


What Types of Jail Exist?

The following types of jails are common within localized municipalities existing within the United States:
Local Jail: An administrative, penal holding cell – or an additional method of confinement – in which individuals requiring brief confinement may be held until the completion of processing
County Jail: A Jail that provides incarceration for inmates accused of crimes less severe in nature within the expanse of a county within a specific state

Inmate Receives 60 Years for Assaulting Correctional Officers

Inmate Receives 60 Years for Assaulting Correctional Officers


On October 16, 2012, the US Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado announced that Antoine Wallace received another 720 months in federal prison for assaulting and injuring federal officers at the United States Penitentiary in Florence, Colorado.  He was currently serving a sentence of 218 months for robbing a bank in Maryland.  


According to court documents, Wallace was in a meeting with correctional counselors before the assault began.  The counselors told Wallace that his unit orderly job was being relieved, and he became furious.  The correctional counselors called off the meeting.  


Wallace became even angrier in the common area and soon returned to the area where the meeting occurred.  He proceeded to punch the first counselor in the face and knocked him to the floor.  The second officer went into a defensive position, but Wallace punched him in the face and made him fall to the floor as well.  


Wallace left the office, but as the second counselor the office and called for help, Wallace began a second attack.  He punched the counselor several more times in the face and caused his head to hit the concrete floor.  A large pool of blood began coming out of his head.  


Emergency staff at the prison responded to the call.  The first counselor was sent to the hospital for head injuries.  The second officer’s face was so badly damaged that he was unrecognizable.  He was life-lined to the hospital and remained in intensive care for days.  The second officer is now permanently disabled and can never work again.


U.S. Attorney John Walsh stated, “The defendant in this case severely injured a Bureau of Prisons counselor and caused him permanent injuries.  For that crime, Wallace will spend the next 60 years of his life in prison.”


Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation
 

A History of Prison in the World

A History of Prison in the World

The concept of a penal colony or jail can date as far back to around 400 B.C. in Jerusalem, where dungeons were used to hold prisoners that were incarcerated for committing crimes. 
However, jail as it is known today is more closely related to the jail system that was implemented in Britain during the 19th century, arising out of the philosophy and views of Jeremy Bentham. Prior to Bentham, a penal colony or jail was simply a holding place or facility for criminals awaiting hanging. Bentham would be responsible for imparting the notion that having criminals incarcerated could also be used as punishment, which was a completely revolutionary concept at the time.
In the United States, the history of jail and the penal colony can be traced back to the colonies established in Pennsylvania, in particular, William Penn’s colony. William Penn would abolish some of the punishment tactics and codes from England that seemed too severe for the crime. Death was a common punishment, even for what can be considered minor crimes. Aside from major crimes such as murder, imprisonment in jail was used as a punishment, along with fines and labor. 
Prisons were mostly used to hold those awaiting trial, witnesses, and even those that owed debts, though this would change with the onset of the American Revolution. As more people would become incarcerated, penal colonies would have to expand and become larger in order to house more inmates. One of the first major prison facilities that was constructed in the United States would also be founded in Pennsylvania, which would become known as the Eastern State Penitentiary, which began construction in 1822 and would be completed in 1836.

At Least Seven Inmates Poisoned from Prison Hooch

At Least Seven Inmates Poisoned from Prison Hooch


On November 26, 2012, the Pinal County Communication Director, Heather Murphy, announced that at least seven inmates from the Special Management Unit 1 of the Arizona State Prison Complex Eyman in Florence, Arizona show signs of botulism poisoning.


Last Saturday, four inmates became extremely ill and underwent treatment at a hospital.  Another man arrived later Saturday night, and two more inmates showed up to the hospital with similar symptoms on Sunday.  


All of the inmates are in intensive care and receiving treatment with anti-toxins.  Once the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) receive a botulism poisoning confirmation, they release the anti-toxin to the state.  


Authorities believe the men ingested thetoxin from a home-made alcoholic drink called “hooch” or “pruno.”  The drink is made from fermented fruit.  Laboratory testing has not confirmed the origin of the toxin as of yet though.  


Sickness and death were common from botulism in the past, and the majority of the toxin came from home-canned fruit and foods.  Increased safety in handling canned items has decreased the amount of botulism outbreaks in recent years.  


Botulism is most often spread when the poison is ingested.  The toxin can also spread through a wound or IV drug use.  The poison is not spread by breathing, sneezing, or in the air.  


An eighth inmate from the same state prison in Arizona was transferred to the hospital on November 27, 2012.  His condition was not bad enough to administer anti-toxins, but he is still undergoing medical care at the hospital.  


Early symptoms of exposure to Botulism include trouble speaking, chewing, and swallowing.  If the person remains untreated, they can feel weak, have difficulty breathing, and even become paralyzed.  


Again, it is believed the inmates ingested the toxin from the hooch, but the investigation is ongoing.  


Source: Pinal County Government

Prisoner Explained

Prisoner Explained

A prisoner is an individual that has been convicted of a crime and has been sentenced to serve out a period of incarceration as punishment. A prisoner will usually serve out a sentence in a prison or jail, and the length of time in which the prisoner will be incarcerated will depend on the laws or statutes that were violated and the severity of the crime. A prisoner can also be a person that has been captured by the enemy during a time of war.
Prisoners will serve out their sentence as best fit and determined by the court and legal system. During the period of incarceration, prisoners will be restrained to remaining within the grounds of a correctional facility. The level of security of the facility in which a prisoner may be placed will usually be concurrent with the type of crime that was committed and how severe such a crime is. 
For example, murderers will usually be placed in maximum security prisons, where it is crucial to have constant surveillance of the prisoner population due to the danger they may pose to other prisoners and correctional staff. On the other hand, individuals that are convicted of lesser crimes, such as those that can be classified as “white collar crimes,” will usually be placed in minimum security prisons. These prisons will not have constant surveillance of the prisoners and their personal liberties may not be as restricted as those prisoners in higher security facilities.

Federal Bureau of Prisons vs. Department of Corrections

Federal Bureau of Prisons vs. Department of Corrections

When it comes to the governing and overseeing of the correctional facility and prison system in the United States, it can be said that it is delegated between two delegations, the Federal Bureau of Prisons and the Department of Corrections. The Federal Bureau of Prisons is the law enforcement agency which is a branch of the United States Department of Justice which is responsible for the administration and governing of the federal prison system in the United States. 
The Department of Corrections refers to the local agency of state or local governments which are responsible for the treatment of inmates in state facilities. Though both may seem to be one in the same, the Federal Bureau of Prisons is strictly responsible for those facilities that are controlled by the federal government, while the Department of Corrections will be controlled by the state. Each state in the country will have its own Department of Corrections and inherent laws and regulations.
The Federal Bureau of Prisons was first established in 1930, with the ultimate goal providing for inmates on a more human and professional manner. Furthermore, the Bureau was also developed in order to provide for a more centralized governing body for the eleven federal prisons that exist in the United States. 
The Bureau, aside for overlooking the federal correctional facilities and prisons, is also in charge of carrying out all of the federally ordered executions in the United States, for the exception of those mandated under military law. The correctional facility that holds the execution chamber is located in Terre Haute, Indiana, which is entails executions to be carried out by lethal injection. 

Overview of the Federal Bureau of Prisons

Overview of the Federal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Bureau of Prisons is the federally government agency that is in charge of the administration of the federal prison system in the United States. The Federal Bureau of Prisons, or FBOP, is a considered to be a branch of the United States Department of Justice, and is also responsible for handling inmates that committed federal crimes in the District of Columbia as well. 
The Federal Bureau of Prisons was established in 1930 in order to provide a more concise and centralized faction to govern the eleven federal prisons that existed in the country at that time. The FBOP was originally intended to provide a more professional service and organization of the federal prisons, while also allowing for a more humane treatment and care for inmates of federal prisons and facilities.
As of today, the Federal Bureau of Prisons has its central headquarters in Washington, D.C., though it also has six regional offices. The FBOP currently is in charge of over 119 institutions and facilities that currently handle nearly 208,000 federal prisoners. Furthermore, the FBOP is also in charge of over 28 community corrections offices and has two training centers. 
Due to the large system of facilities that the Federal Bureau of Prisons overlooks, a sub-section known as the National Institute of Corrections was created in order to assist with the local and state correctional agencies and facilities. The NIC was first established in 1974 by the United States Congress and plays a more important role with the various State Department of Corrections that are in place today. 

Prison Commissary Facts

Prison Commissary Facts

Within the prison systems of the United States, inmates will usually be issued a particular job in which money can be made during their stay in the penitentiary. However, wages will prove to be quite minimal and are intended to provide inmates with an income that can be used after they are released from prison or within the prison itself. Prison commissaries are found in most prisons, where inmates can purchase certain items while in jail. The Prison commissary is usually like a warehouse where items that have been approved to be used by inmates can be purchased. This may include items such as cigarettes, books, and other types of leisure items.
Purchasing items from the prison commissary will usually entail a very particular and regimented process. Inmates will receive a list of the items and goods that are available at the commissary, and fill out the list for the desired items. Inmates will be designated a certain day in which they can go to the commissary and purchase these goods. 
Commissaries are usually run by prison guards or corrections officers, though other prisoners may also be employed for the position. Because cash is not allowed in prisons, commissaries deduct the prices of the items from the accounts that are set up for each prisoner where their earnings from the prison jobs are stored. Some commissaries and jails issue inmates ID cards which are used similarly to debit cards. Also, prisoners are also allowed to receive money from family and friends on the outside, which is placed into such an account. 

The Truth About Prison Life

The Truth About Prison Life

When a person becomes incarcerated in a prison, his/her life is going to change quite dramatically. Life in prison will be very restricted, for personal liberties that one may be accommodated to or has taken for granted will most likely be stripped. However, prison life will vary depending on the nature of the person’s crime and what kind of facility one is meant to serve out their sentence. Generally speaking, prison life is constructed based upon schedules. Furthermore, every kind of activity, particularly those carried outside of the holding cells such as eating meals. 
A typical day in prison life can be outlined as follows: breakfast, work or school, lunch, work or school, dinner, free time, showering, and finally sleep. This kind of a strict scheduled routine is meant to establish control and order in a prison facility while also promoting a sense of self-control in the inmates themselves.
Much of life in prison spent within the confines of the jail cell, which is usually a eight by six cell. The jail cell will have a sink and toilet and a metal bed that is secured to the floor or to the wall. In some cases, some jail cells will hold two inmates, where a bunk bed may be found in a similar fashion.
However, due to the nature of the inmates and their lives of crime, prison life may not be completely as it intended to be by the correctional system. It is well documented that inmates will often times gravitate toward those they have things in common, particularly those that were members of gangs prior to being incarcerated. Furthermore, many prisons will have networks of commerce among the inmates where certain items–whether illegal or not–are often traded and/or bartered. 

Understanding Prison Visiting Hours

Understanding Prison Visiting Hours

All prisoners in the United States will usually be granted visitation rights, at least when a prisoner first enters a prison. When a person is person first enters the penitentiary, part of the paper work that must be filled out will include a list of family members and friends that are allowed to visit the prisoner during the incarceration sentence. 
Visitation rights will be limited on a monthly basis and each person listed for visitation privileges must be approved prior that actual visitation. Those not included in the list may also be allowed visitation, though they must be approved and may entail a waiting period before visitation rights are granted.
Visitation rights are to be considered more along the lines of privileges due to the fact that they can be revoked. Furthermore, in some cases, visitation privileges may not be granted to some inmates due to the nature of the person’s crime. However, once in prison and visitation rights are granted, an inmate can be limited visitations and even have them suspended on the basis of behavior while incarcerated.
Visiting hours in most prisons will usually coincide with those of a normal work day, typically on a 9am to 5pm schedule, though this will vary depending on the facility. At lower level penitentiaries, visiting hours are held in what resembles a waiting room, with many others having visitors at the same time. In maximum level prisons, visiting hours are done through a glass window with the use of telephones. Such visitations are always supervised by guards and those visiting may be subject to search before and after each visit.